Dangerously Misquoted Bible Verse (Psalm 20:4)

Psalm 20:4- Grant thee according to thine own heart, and fulfill all thy counsel.

False doctrine made out of this, would be  the “follow your heart doctrine.”  Let us now compare scripture to expose this doctrine.

Jeremiah 17:9- The heart is decietful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?

Follow your heart is one of the worst pieces of advice that you can give.  If you have the desire to murder someone, then should you follow your heart then?  No, I didn’t think so either.  Now let us go back to Psalm 20 to find out what this verse really means.

Psalm 20:1-4- The Lord hear thee in the day of trouble; the name of the God of Jacob defend thee; [2] Send thee help from the sanctuary, and strengthen thee out of Zion; [3] Remember all thy offerings, and accept thy burnt sacrifice; Selah. [4] Grant thee according to thine own heart, and fulfil all thy counsel.

This whole passage is a prayer to God for strength, with an attitude of God’s will being done (verse 4).  Not a piece of encouragement to follow your heart.

Now, if you use the NIV, like many people who misquote this verse, then the passage would read ….

“May the Lord answer you when you are in distress; may the name of the God of Jacob protect you. May he send you help from the sanctuary and grant you support from Zion. May he remember all your sacrifices and accept your burnt offerings. May he give you the desire of your heart and make all your plans succeed.”

That is a complete change of doctrine.  Completely it from a prayer to God to words of encouragement to people.  Notice how it also says “may he give you the desire of your heart.”  Again the human heart is “decietful above all things, and desperately wicked” according to Jeremiah 17:9.

Do not be decieved by what I call “one versism.”  Compare scriptures to find out what that verse really means.  I plan on doing more of these posts exposing dangerously misquoted verses.  In the name of The Lord Jesus Christ I write unto you.  Amen.

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